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Salsa & Dip Bowls

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  1. Winco PMSB-4 4 oz. Molcajete Salsa Bowl
    Winco PMSB-4 4 oz. Molcajete Salsa Bowl
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    Burkett Price: $9.99 / Pack of 4 Each
  2. G.E.T. Viva Mexico 5" 10 oz. Molcajete Bowl | Model No. MOJ-802-BK
    G.E.T. Viva Mexico 5" 10 oz. Molcajete Bowl | Model No. MOJ-802-BK
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    Burkett Price: $51.99 / Dozen
  3. G.E.T. Viva Mexico 4" 4 oz. Molcajete Bowl | Model No. MOJ-801-BK
    G.E.T. Viva Mexico 4" 4 oz. Molcajete Bowl | Model No. MOJ-801-BK
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    Burkett Price: $28.99 / Dozen
  4. G.E.T. Viva Mexico 7-3/4" 26 oz. Molcajete Bowl | Model No. MOJ-803-BK
    G.E.T. Viva Mexico 7-3/4" 26 oz. Molcajete Bowl | Model No. MOJ-803-BK
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    Burkett Price: $115.99 / Dozen
  5. G.E.T. Viva Mexico 9" 64 oz. Molcajete Bowl | Model No. MOJ-804-BK
    G.E.T. Viva Mexico 9" 64 oz. Molcajete Bowl | Model No. MOJ-804-BK
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    Burkett Price: $199.99 / Dozen
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Any restaurant that serves southwestern or Mexican food needs to stock up on salsa dishes. While any sauce dish or ramekin can be used to serve salsa, salsa dishes are special items made to resemble a traditional salsa dish or a molcajete. These dishes also have a wide rim, making it easier to dip chips in the sauce. A salsa dish usually holds between five and ten ounces of salsa. They should be brought to the table as soon as a new party sits down. In addition to serving as a salsa dish, these items can double as a queso or guacamole dish. Most restaurants that use commercial warewashers should be sure to purchase dishwasher-safe salsa dishes, since a dish will need to be washed after each table turns over. Salsa dishes are available in a wide variety of materials, including ceramic, glass and plastic. While ceramic or stone are the most traditional materials for salsa dishes, many modern Mexican and southwestern restaurants choose plastic, since it will probably never break or chip.